Ronnie’s book back in print

For those of you who may not have heard, Ronnie Spector’s memoir, Be My Baby: How I Survived Mascara, Miniskirts, and Madness, or My Life as a Fabulous Ronette has been republished in a newly redesigned edition, which is available as an eBook and in no fewer than three different printed variations—including two that feature full color interior photos.

If you’re reading Cue Castanets, I probably don’t need to remind you of the incredible story Ronnie tells in her book. I remember it made quite an impact on me what I got my hands on it during the early 00s, immediately after discovering the power of the Wall of Sound through the Back to Mono box. A very entertaining read indeed, so it’s great to have a new edition containing every word of Ronnie’s one-of-a-kind life story, exactly as she told it in the first edition of the book published 25 years ago next month.

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As a fan of all things Spector, I’m guessing you’ve already read the book and that you’re probably more interested in learning about what’s new to this edition. And the answer to that is plenty. Ronnie’s collaborator on the memoir, Vince Waldron, – who has helped Ronnie in her publishing ventures since the publication of the first edition in 1990 – has sent me a bit of info about the re-designed edition. So for now, I’ll hand this space over to Vince for him to present the new edition, including some photo samples and links to where the book in its various forms can be bought online.

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The following info is courtesy of Vince Waldron:

The Ronettes captured live in performance by amateur photographer and lifelong Ronnie Spector fan Bob Volturno in 1965—just one of the never-before-published color photos that appears in the newly revised edition of Ronnie’s classic memoir, Be My Baby.
The Ronettes captured live in performance by amateur photographer and lifelong Ronnie Spector fan Bob Volturno in 1965—just one of the never-before-published color photos that appears in the newly revised edition of Ronnie’s classic memoir, Be My Baby.

“Above all, you’ll get 75 color and black and white images, most of them from Ronnie’s personal archives, and many of them seeing print for the very first time.

If you have one of the previous editions of Be My Baby, you probably recall that they all featured brief inset photo sections that contained only a handful of black and white images. For the new edition, Ronnie decided to go all out and include as many photos as could be squeezed into the book’s 358 pages. And this time the images are logically laid out through the whole book, allowing the reader to savor each one in the context of the surrounding story.

Ronnie dug deep into her personal archive to find images that hadn’t appeared in print before, and she insisted that we pepper the book with as many color images as possible. That’s one of the reasons we opted to publish color editions of the new book in paperback and hardcover in addition to the standard black and white trade paperback that I’m pretty sure no one reading this is going to settle for. Actually, as much as I enjoy holding a tangible printed book in my hands, I must confess to being a sucker for the eBook edition of Ronnie’s book, if only because it’s the only one that features enlargeable high resolution images that reveal every facet of the book’s 75 color and black and white pictures.

The program for 1962 edition of deejay Murray the K’s annual holiday rock and roll show at the Brooklyn Fox—another never-before-published artifact from author Ronnie Spector’s archive that appears in the newly revised edition of her memoir, Be My Baby.
The program for 1962 edition of deejay Murray the K’s annual holiday rock and roll show at the Brooklyn Fox—another never-before-published artifact from author Ronnie Spector’s archive that appears in the newly revised edition of her memoir, Be My Baby.

The other big draw to the new edition for anyone reading Cue Castanets is the completely revised, corrected, and thoroughly updated Ronnie Spector Discography that appears as an appendix in the back of the book. Readers of the earlier editions of this book may recall the lengthy discographies that were included in those previous issues, but they were nothing compared to the massive 30 page document that appears here.

By way of comparison, the discography in the 1990 first edition of Ronnie’s book included 101 entries. By the time the book was reprinted in 2004, that discography had grown to 144 entries. Now, just over ten years later, the number of entries in the current discography has expanded to 173, a testament not only to Ronnie’s still thriving recording career, but also to the comprehensiveness of the new discography, which now includes a number of new entries for songs that were overlooked or unknown when the earlier discographies were compiled.

The picture sleeve from Ronnie’s 1971 Apple Records single—an artifact from author Ronnie Spector’s private archive that appears in the newly revised edition of her memoir, Be My Baby.
The picture sleeve from Ronnie’s 1971 Apple Records single—an artifact from author Ronnie Spector’s private archive that appears in the newly revised edition of her memoir, Be My Baby.

We also strove to make the discography as up-to-date as our late-2014 deadline allowed. (And, in case you’re keeping track, the final two chronological entries in this one are Ronnie’s contribution to a new Bryan Ferry album, and Ronnie’s cover of The Beatles’ “P.S. I Love You” that was included in the deluxe edition of last year’s “Art of Paul McCartney” boxed set.) It’s probably worth noting that this discography, like its precursors, was compiled with the generous assistance and scrupulous input of some of the most respected Spector fans the world over, including Peter Andreasen, Kevin Dilworth, James Fogerty, Randi Russi, Danny J. Williams, Bob Volturno, and David A. Young, to name only a few.

As a fan of Spector-era music myself, I’m delighted to report that the result of all that effort is the most comprehensive survey of Ronnie’s recorded career ever published—and may be one of the most thorough examinations of the recorded output of any Spector-era artist currently in print.

Ronnie Spector in New York in 1973, captured © Kevin Dilworth—one of 75 stunning color and black and white images that appear in the newly revised edition of Ronnie Spector’s memoir, Be My Baby.
Ronnie Spector in New York in 1973, captured © Kevin Dilworth—one of 75 stunning color and black and white images that appear in the newly revised edition of Ronnie Spector’s memoir, Be My Baby.

If you’d like to know more about this new edition of Ronnie’s book—or perhaps even order a copy!—here are links to the four variations of the new edition that are available now at an online bookstore near you. If you need more information, including media inquiries or requests for legitimate review copies, you can contact me directly through the email link at bemybaby.com.

Be My Baby (Kindle eBook edition)  $18.95

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0105UI5TM/?tag=classicsitcoms

This elegantly designed eBook features the complete text of Ronnie’s 1990 memoir along with 75 enlargeable color and black and white images, a fully-hypertext linked index, and the thoroughly updated Ronnie Spector Discography. Although the link above connects to the Kindle edition, the eBook is available on all major digital book platforms, including GooglePlay, Apple’s iBooks, B&N’s Nook, and Kobo.

Be My Baby (Standard trade paperback)  $19.95

https://www.createspace.com/5017799

This standard black and white trade paperback contains the same content as the eBook, except that the images all appear in grayscale throughout the book.

Be My Baby (Deluxe color trade paperback) $24.95

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1942570058/?tag=classicsitcoms

This deluxe color edition contains the same content as the eBook and black and white trade paperback edition, except that the color images appear in color in the book’s interior pages, and there are touches of color typography throughout. I may be a biased, but I think any serious Ronnie Spector fan will find this edition well worth the extra five bucks over the cost of the standard black and white trade paperback edition.

Be My Baby (Deluxe color hardcover edition)  $29.95

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1942570031/?tag=classicsitcoms

This deluxe color edition contains the same interior content as the Deluxe color trade paperback edition, including all the color images in color, and with color accents in the typography and layout throughout the book. With its classy clothbound cover and glossy wrap-around dust jacket, this edition gives the best bang for the buck for the serious Spector collector.”

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